Texas Medical Board “Suspends” Dr. Arafiles And Fails the Public

Rolando Arafiles

In a move that begs the question “What does a physician have to do to REALLY get his license suspended in Texas?”, the Texas Medical Board (TMB) has decided to allow Winkler County medical darling, and multiple felony indicted,  Dr. Rolando Arafiles to continue to practice medicine provided he pass the TMB exam on board laws and rules governing medical practice that all new licensees must take and pass, take a remedial medical education class of his choice and pay $5000.00. He will be on probation for 4 years.

The board also ordered Arafiles be monitored by another physician and submit patient medical and billing records for review. The monitor will report findings back to the board.

In the mediated order, in  lieu of a formal hearing before an administrative law judge, signed in Austin Friday, the board concluded that Arafiles failed to treat emergency room patients properly and failed to document patient diagnoses and treatment plans. How the order of the board will improve his clinical skills is anyone’s guess. The board also found that Arafiles improperly tried to intimidate two Winkler County Memorial Hospital nurses who reported him to the medical board for unethical behavior, activity which has led to grand jury felony indictments against him which are still pending.

Arafiles is no stranger to board sanctions. He was placed under board order on April 13, 2007, prohibiting him from supervising physicians assistants for 3 years and requiring him to complete completing remedial medial education classes. That round of sanctions ended on April 13, 2010. Not 3 months later on June 28, 2010 a new formal complaint was filed by the board which contained scathing allegations.

The action by the TMB is an absurd joke considering the charging document authored by the board. IT only half the allegations are true the TMB has failed miserably to protect the public with this slap on the wrist.  Law Med is flabbergasted.

Physician in Texas Whistleblower Case Put on Probation by State Board

By Robert Lowes, MedScape Medical News

February 7, 2011 — Rolando Arafiles, Jr., MD, the center of a whistle-blowing case that has escalated to criminal charges, has been put on probation for 4 years, fined $5000, and ordered to enroll in a remedial medical education program by the Texas Medical Board (TMB).

In an order announced Friday, the TMB suspended his license but stayed the suspension, meaning that Dr. Arafiles can continue to practice medicine under board monitoring. However, he must take and pass a TMB examination on laws and board rules governing medical practice within the next 12 months. If he fails the exam, given to all would-be physicians in Texas, his license will be pulled immediately. The same thing will happen if he does not successfully complete his required remedial education program within 12 months.

The TMB stated that it reached a mediated agreement with Dr. Arafiles about these terms of discipline while his case awaited a hearing by a state administrative judge. The order constitutes a public reprimand of the 58-year-old clinician, according to the board.

The mediated agreement is the latest development in a story of come-uppance that began when 2 nurses filed an anonymous letter with the TMB in 2009 about Dr. Arafiles and the quality of his patient care. The nurses, Anne Mitchell, RN, and Vickilyn Galle, RN, were his co-workers at Winkler County Memorial Hospital in Kermit, Texas.

When Dr. Arafiles learned of the TMB complaint, he helped Winkler County Sheriff Robert Roberts, Jr., a friend of his, find out who wrote the letter. The nurses were then charged with misuse of official information, a third-degree felony punishable by prison time. The hospital also fired the pair. The charge against Galle was dropped, and a jury found Mitchell not guilty, much to the delight of organized nursing.

In a role reversal, Dr. Arafiles, Roberts, the attorney for Winkler County, and the former administrator of Winkler County Memorial Hospital now face criminal charges in connection with the prosecution and firing of the 2 nurses. The defendants have already agreed to pay Mitchell and Galle $375,000 apiece to settle a civil lawsuit that the nurses filed against them in federal court.

Last year, the state medical board charged Dr. Arafiles with poor medical judgment, nontherapeutic prescribing, failure to maintain adequate records, overbilling, witness intimidation, and other violations. According to the board, he once stitched part of the rubber tip from suture kit scissors to a patient’s torn, broken thumb (an attempt to stabilize it, the physician contended). Dr. Arafiles, an advocate of alternative medicine, also rubbed an olive oil solution on an abscess caused by methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus.

The findings of the TMB in last week’s disciplinary action did not mention the incident involving the scissors’ rubber tip, but otherwise sketched out the same clinical shortcomings. The board found fault with Dr. Arafiles’ emergency department care, the hormone therapy he administered to patients with thyroid disease, and his decision to order hormone replacement therapy for a woman with a history of deep-vein thrombosis, a contraindication. It also cited him for poorly documenting patient care and intimidating the 2 nurses who had reported him to the board.

The board gave Dr. Arafiles the choice of 2 remedial education programs for physicians, designed to assess someone’s clinical competence and provide retraining as necessary. In addition, Dr. Arafiles must take 8 hours of continuing medication education in medical record-keeping and another 8 hours in evaluating and treating thyroid disease.

When contacted by Medscape Medical News, Dr. Arafiles declined to comment on the board decision.

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3 Responses to Texas Medical Board “Suspends” Dr. Arafiles And Fails the Public

  1. lawmed lawmed says:

    The tragedy of this case is that proper internal monitoring procedures DID identify this physician as practicing outside the accepted standard of care. Reports from the M&M conferences or the peer review meetings were received and were clear indications of a problem. This is a very small hospital with a small medical staff…they can fit in one car…the risk manager/QA coordinator and the medical staff coordinator sounded the alarm loud and clear and were told by the hospital administration to be quiet and say nothing. So these two nurses went to the sate medical board. Long story short they were fired by the hosp. administration for reporting the physician to the board, and the local sheriff arrested them and charged them with felonies for ‘improper use of government information for a nongovernmental purpose’ alleging they had engaged in a vicious plot to destroy the reputation of his former business partner, physician and golf busy…Dr. Arafiles.

    The result: the hospital was fined and admonished by the state for their actions, the nurses were cleared after great legal expense, the nurses sued the hosp. and the county and won a $750,000 judgment, the administrator quit, the medical board suspended and then probationed the doctor’s license, and the DR., the sheriff, the prosecutor and the hospital administrator have all been arrested after a grand jury charged THEM with multiple felonies for their actions.

    The ONLY ‘good’ news to relate is that this physician WITHOUT QUESTION is deserving of ALL sanctions the medical board can conceive. His litany of bizarre medical acts is astonishing. one need go no further than intentionally sewing a portion of a surgical glove onto a finger as a wound care method….or commandeering patient information to contact them without consent too sell his ‘homeopathy’, including the most outside the fringe remedies. He also deserves to go to jail. He colluded with his good ol’ boy buddy the sheriff to obtain confidential medical board complaint information and then used it…and patient medical records without consent…to engage in a vendetta against the two nurses who exposed his dangerous clinical practice.

    The whole saga is covered in the most extensive detail ANYWHERE right here on our blog:

    http://lawmedconsultant.com/winkler-county-page

  2. Justice says:

    I am a practicing physician from a state other than Texas. It is easy to read a story like this, especially from a lay perspective, and formulate a completely negative opinion against this physician without any desire to examine the matter any further or closer.

    Upon closer examination it may ,in fact, be true that this physician warrants exactly what is being alleged against him. However, the complete opposite may be the case as well and, sadly, should that be found later, he will be given very little to no press to indicate such. I have witnessed this many times throughout my career.

    If, in fact, this physician is exactly how he is being portrayed, where were the internal monitoring procedures at his facility? What were the reports from the M&M conferences or the peer review meetings within his ER department?
    Why does this appear to be a “he said she said” battle between this physician and two nurses at his facility with direct resulting action by the Medical Board and now the self serving (sad to say) “legal system” with no mentioned intermediary input?

    Contrary to what the Medical Board and the “legal system” will have the public believe, there is no incentive for a physician’s peers to inappropriately “cover” for a fellow physician who is engaging in questionable or harmful practice thus endangering society. In fact, quite the contrary, as these fellow physicians (and the treatment facility) would stand to share, either directly or indirectly, in any resulting liability.

    The proper internal monitoring procedures, as mentioned above, would have caught any adverse incidents and thereby would have served as early identification and correction of a questionable and impaired physician, thus rendering this resulting story unnecessary.

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